Calder | Prouvé

June 8 - November 2, 2013

Download Press Release PDF (43 Kb)
French Version PDF (60 Kb)

[Scroll down for French version / Veuillez trouver ci-dessous la version française]


Opening reception: Saturday, June 8th, from 6:00 to 8:00pm


The underlying sense of form in my work has been the system of the Universe, or part thereof….What I mean is that the idea of detached bodies floating in space, of different sizes and densities, perhaps of different colors and temperatures, and surrounded and interlarded with wisps of gaseous condition, and some at rest, while others move in peculiar manners, seems to me the ideal source of form.
—Alexander Calder

My creative process imposes from the outset a formative idea that is rigorously realisable. The formative idea is, above all, the understanding of an ensemble as a whole.
—Jean Prouvé

Gagosian Paris, in collaboration with Galerie Patrick Seguin, is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Alexander Calder and by Jean Prouvé.

Calder's invention of the mobile (a term that Marcel Duchamp coined to describe these new kinetic sculptures) resonated with both early Conceptual and Constructivist art as well as the language of early abstract painting. Flat, abstract shapes made in steel, boldly painted in a restricted primary palette, black or white, hang in perfect balance from wires. While the latent energy and dynamism of the mobiles remained of primary interest to Calder throughout his life, he also created important standing sculptures, which Jean Arp named "stabiles" to distinguish them from their ethereal kinetic counterparts. These works reject the weight and solidity of sculptural mass, yet displace space in a three-dimensional manner while remaining linear, open, planar, and suggestive of motion.

Prouvé is widely acknowledged as one of the twentieth century’s most influential industrial designers, with a wide-ranging oeuvre that brought a strong social conscience to bold, elegant design within an economy of means. A passionate teacher, engineer, and craftsman as well as a self-taught architect and designer, his career spanned more than sixty years, during which time he produced furniture for the home, office, and classroom as well as prefabricated houses, building components, and façades at Ateliers Jean Prouvé and his factory in Maxéville. Combining research, prototype development, and production, he was instrumental in ushering in building processes based on mechanized industry rather than artisanal practice.

Calder and Prouvé met in the early 1950s. They corresponded regularly between Calder’s frequent trips to Paris, exchanging ideas on architecture and sculpture. In 1958, Calder collaborated with Prouvé to construct the steel base of La Spirale, a monumental mobile for the UNESCO site in Paris. Calder later gave Prouvé two mobiles—as well as a gouache with a dedication.

“Calder I Prouvé,” installed in the lofty spaces of Gagosian Le Bourget, evokes comparisons in the broad, expressive range of production using new technologies that the close friends and collaborators evinced in their parallel practices as artist and designer. Calder’s mobiles—Rouge triomphant (1963), Pods and Shoots (1966), and Les trois barres (1970)—are perfect studies of abstract kinetic form and color, while Stabile (1975), an imposing sculpture made of bolted sheet metal, demonstrates a mastery of gravitational principles with its weighty steel arcs borne miraculously by just a few points of contact with the ground. Prouvé’s strong, distinctive lines are visible in furniture and architectural projects, including Pavillon démontable (1944), Potence (1950), Table Flavigny n° 504 (1951), Brise-soleil en aluminium (1957), and Station essence Total (1969), while the playful geometry and bright turquoise of Chaise Métropole n°305 (1953) echo Calder’s more whimsical sensibilities. Considered together, these works testify to the fruitful exchange between two giants of Modernism in its most utopian aspirations.

Alexander Calder was born in Pennsylvania in 1898 and attended the Stevens Institute of Technology and Art Students League. He died in New York City in 1976. His work is in public and private collections worldwide, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Calder's public commissions are on view in cities all over the world and his work has been the subject of hundreds of museum exhibitions, including “Alexander Calder: 1898–1976,” National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (1998, traveled to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art); “Calder: Gravity and Grace,” Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao (2003, traveled to Reina Sofia, Madrid); “The Surreal Calder,” The Menil Collection, Houston (2005, traveled to San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts through 2006); “Calder Jewelry,” Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach (2008, traveled to Philadelphia Museum; Metropolitan Museum, New York; Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; San Diego Museum of Art; and the Grand Rapids Art Museum); “Alexander Calder: The Paris Years, 1926–1933,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2008, traveled to the Centre Pompidou, Paris and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto); “Calder: Sculptor of Air,” Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome (2009–10); “Alexander Calder: A Balancing Act,” Seattle Art Museum (2009–10); “Alexander Calder and Contemporary Art,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2010, traveled to Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; the Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; and the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, NC); “Calder’s Portraits: A New Language,” National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. (2011); and “Calder,” Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul (forthcoming July 2013). “Calder Gallery II” is on view at the Fondation Beyeler, Riehen, Switzerland through June 2014.

Jean Prouvé was born in Nancy, France in 1901, where he died in 1984. His work is included in private and public collections worldwide, including Centre Pompidou, Paris and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Major exhibitions include “Jean Prouvé: Constructeur, 1901–1984,” Centre Pompidou, Paris (1990–91); “Jean Prouvé: Three Nomadic Structures,” Pacific Design Center, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2005); “Jean Prouvé: A Tropical House,” Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2006); “Jean Prouvé: The Poetics of the Technical Object,” Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Germany (2006–07, traveled to Kamakura Museum of Modern Art; Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt; Netherlands Architecture Institute, Maastricht; Hotel de Ville de Boulogne-Billancourt, Paris; Design Museum, London; and Museo dell'Ara Pacis, Rome, among other venues; a multi-exhibition, multi-venue tribute at Musée des beaux-arts, Nancy, France (2012). “A Passion for Jean Prouvé: From Furniture to Architecture” is on view at Pinacoteca Agnelli, Turin until September 2013.

Galerie Patrick Seguin specializes in twentieth century French design and architecture, in particular Jean Prouvé, Charlotte Perriand, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, and Jean Royère. In 2004, Seguin presented the works of Jean Prouvé and Charlotte Perriand at Gagosian Gallery in Los Angeles. In 2008 Gagosian collaborated with Seguin to present Richard Prince’s sculptural assemblages in Paris; and in 2010, an exhibition of Prouvé’s prefabricated architectural designs inaugurated the project space at Gagosian Paris.

Press Enquiries
Claudine Colin CommunicationContact: Eloïse Daniels
E. eloise@claudinecolin.com
T. +33.1.42.72.60.01
www.claudinecolin.com

For all other information please contact the gallery at paris@gagosian.com or at +33.1.48.16.16.47.
 


Vernissage: le samedi 8 juin de 18h00 à 20h00


«Le sens sous-jacent de mon œuvre fut le système de l’Univers, ou en partie... Je veux dire par là que l’idée de corps détachés flottant dans l’espace, de corps de dimensions et de densités différentes, peut-être de couleurs et de chaleurs différentes, environnés et entrelacés de substance gazeuse, les uns immobiles tandis que d’autres bougent suivant leur propre rythme; tous ces corps me paraissent l’origine idéale des forms.»
—Alexander Calder

«Tout objet à créer impose à la base une ‘idée constructive’ rigoureusement réalisable. L’idée constructive, c’est d’abord la compréhension d’une totalité d’un ensemble.»
—Jean Prouvé

Gagosian Gallery Paris, en collaboration avec la Galerie Patrick Seguin, est heureuse de présenter une exposition d’œuvres d’Alexandre Calder et de Jean Prouvé.

L’invention du mobile par Calder (un terme formulé par Marcel Duchamp pour décrire ces nouvelles sculptures cinétiques), résonne à la fois avec les débuts de l’art conceptuel et du constructivisme mais aussi avec le langage des débuts de la peinture abstraite. Des éléments plats de formes abstraites, en métal et peints de couleurs primaires, ou en blanc et noir, sont suspendus en parfait équilibre à l’aide de câbles fins. Si l’énergie latente et le dynamisme des mobiles ont constitué l’intérêt principal de Calder durant sa vie, il a aussi créé d’importantes sculptures statiques que Jean Arp surnomma «stabile», afin de les distinguer de leurs pendants cinétiques en suspension. Ces œuvres sont défaites de toute impression de poids ou de solidité de la masse sculpturale, cependant elles habitent l’espace de manière tridimensionnelle, tout en demeurant linéaires, ouvertes, planes et suggestives de mouvement.

Prouvé est mondialement reconnu comme l’un des designers industriels les plus influents du XXe siècle. L’envergure de son œuvre a fortement touché la conscience collective grâce à un design élégant et audacieux et à une économie de moyens. Professeur passionné, ingénieur et artisan, ainsi qu’architecte designer autodidacte, sa carrière s’est étendue sur plus de soixante ans. Durant ces années il a développé et produit du mobilier pour l’habitat, de bureaux et de classes d’écoles mais aussi des maisons préfabriquées, des éléments de construction et des façades d‘architecture dans les Ateliers Jean Prouvé et dans son usine à Maxéville. En combinant recherche, développement de prototypes et production, il fut un pionnier dans l’établissement de constructions industrielles mécanisées, différant de la pratique artisanale.

Calder et Prouvé se sont rencontrés au début des années 1950. Ils ont eu une correspondance régulière entre les voyages fréquents de Calder à Paris, durant laquelle ils échangèrent leurs idées sur l’architecture et la sculpture. En 1958, Calder et Prouvé ont collaboré dans la construction de la base en acier de l’œuvre La Spirale, un mobile monumental construit pour le site de l’Unesco à Paris. Plus tard, Calder donna deux mobiles à Prouvé ainsi qu’une gouache dédicacée.

"Calder I Prouvé," l’exposition installée dans le grand espace de Gagosian Gallery au Bourget, évoque les comparaisons dans leur production—à la fois vaste et expressive: le recours à de nouvelles technologies dont les deux amis et collaborateurs ont fait preuve dans leurs pratiques parallèles en tant qu’artiste et designer. Les mobiles de Calder—Rouge triomphant (1963), Pods and Shoots (1966), et Les trois barres (1970) sont deparfaites études de la forme et de la couleur cinétique abstraite, tandis que Stabile (1975), une sculpture imposante en tôle boulonnée—démontre la maitrise des principes de gravité avec ses arcs en acier lourds portés miraculeusement par seulement quelques points de contact avec le sol. Les lignes fortes et caractéristiques de Prouvé sont visibles dans ses projets architecturaux et dans son mobilier, ainsi que le démontrent Pavillon démontable (1944), Potence (1950), Table Flavigny n°504 (1951), Brise-soleil en aluminium (1957), et Station essence Total (1969), tandis que la géométrie enjouée et la lumineuse couleur bleue turquoise de la Chaise Métropole n°305 (1953) fait écho aux sensibilités les plus fantaisistes de Calder. Ces œuvres témoignent de l’échange fructueux de ces deux géants du modernisme dans ses aspirations les plus utopiques.

Alexander Calder est né en Pennsylvanie en 1898. Il a étudié au Stevens Institute of Technology and Art Students League. Il est mort à New York City en 1976. On retrouve ses oeuvres dans des collections publiques et privées à travers le monde: le Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; le Museum of Modern Art, New York; le Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; et la National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Les commandes publiques de Calder sont visibles dans le monde entier et son travail a fait l’objet de centaines d’expositions dans des musées, parmi lesquels: “Alexander Calder: 1898–1976,” National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (1998, puis au San Francisco Museum of Modern Art); “Calder: Gravity and Grace,” Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao (2003, puis au Reina Sofia, Madrid); “The Surreal Calder,” The Menil Collection, Houston (2005, puis au San Francisco Museum of Modern Art et le Minneapolis Institute of Arts en 2006); “Calder Jewelry,” Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach (2008, exposition itinérante au Philadelphia Museum, Metropolitan Museum, New York,  Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; San Diego Museum of Art, et le Grand Rapids Art Museum); “Alexander Calder: The Paris Years, 1926–1933,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2008, puis exposée au Centre Pompidou, Paris et à l’Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto); “Calder: Sculptor of Air,” Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome (2009–10); “Alexander Calder: A Balancing Act,” Seattle Art Museum (2009–10); “Alexander Calder and Contemporary Art,” Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2010, exposition itinérante à l’Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; le Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas; et le Nasher Museum of Art à la Duke University, Durham, NC); “Calder’s Portraits: A New Language,” National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. (2011); et “Calder,” Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul (à partir de Juillet 2013). La “Calder Gallery II” est exposée à la Fondation Beyeler, Riehen, en Suisse jusqu'en juin 2014.

Jean Prouvé est né à Nancy, en France en 1901. Il y est mort en 1984. Son travail fait partie de collections publiques et privées à travers le monde parmi lesquelles celle du Centre Pompidou, Paris et du Museum of Modern Art, New York. Parmi les expositions majeurs, on peut compter: “Jean Prouvé: Constructeur, 1901–1984,” Centre Pompidou, Paris (1990–91); “Jean Prouvé: Three Nomadic Structures,” Pacific Design Center, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2005); “Jean Prouvé: A Tropical House,” Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2006); “Jean Prouvé: The Poetics of the Technical Object,” Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, Allemagne (2006–07, exposée ensuite au Kamakura Museum of Modern Art; Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt; Netherlands Architecture Institute, Maastricht; Hotel de Ville de Boulogne-Billancourt, Paris; Design Museum, London; et le Museo dell'Ara Pacis de Rome, et  une multi-exposition, multi-venue tribute at Musée des beaux-arts, Nancy, France (2012). L’exposition “A Passion for Jean Prouvé: From Furniture to Architecture” est montrée à la Pinacoteca Agnelli, à Turin jusqu’en septembre 2013.

Galerie Patrick Seguin est spécialisée dans le design et l’architecture français du XXe siècle, notamment Jean Prouvé, Charlotte Perriand, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret et Jean Royère. En 2004, Seguin présente les œuvres de Jean Prouvé et Charlotte Perriand chez Gagosian Gallery à Los Angeles. Les deux galeries renouvellent leur collaboration en présentant en 2008 les sculptures assemblées de Richard Prince à la Galerie Patrick Seguin à Paris; et en 2010, une exposition de l’architecture préfabriquée de Prouvé lors de l’inauguration du Project Space de Gagosian Gallery Paris.

Contact Presse
Claudine Colin Communication
Contact: Eloïse Daniels
E. eloise@claudinecolin.com
T. +33.1.42.72.60.01
www.claudinecolin.com

Pour toute information supplémentaire, merci de contacter la galerie au paris@gagosian.com ou au +33.1.48.16.16.47.




 


Gagosian Gallery was established in 1980 by Larry Gagosian. / Gagosian Gallery a été créée en 1980 par Larry Gagosian.