Ed Ruscha

Complete Set of Artist Books

Twentysix Gasoline Stations, Various Small Fires and Milk, Some Los Angeles Apartments, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, Thirtyfour Parking Lots in Los Angeles, Royal Road Test, Nine Swimming Pools and Broken Glass, Crackers, Babycakes with Weights, Real Estate Opportunities, A Few Palm Trees, Dutch Details, Records, Colored People, and Hard Light

Various publishers, 1963–1978

A rare and highly sought-after set of sixteen artists books by Ed Ruscha. All of the books are first editions and many are either signed (seven) or inscribed (four) by Ruscha.

Each book in this set is complete with original glassine when issued and housed in a recently fabricated archival cloth clamshell box with title and date printed on the spine.

Ruscha’s books mark a significant change in bookmaking by artists as the premise is not to enhance or respond to a text. They are antithetical to the history of livre d’artistes—the books do not contain fine prints (etchings, lithographs, etc.) but are simply printed by the more common offset process. Ruscha’s use of banal subject matter further accentuates his departure from the realm of historical book-making processes.

Made mostly in small editions, these captivating books have received a great deal of critical acclaim, especially in recent years as his prominence as a major contemporary artist has increased.

Ed Ruscha

Complete Set of Artist Books

Twentysix Gasoline Stations, Various Small Fires and Milk, Some Los Angeles Apartments, Every Building on the Sunset Strip, Thirtyfour Parking Lots in Los Angeles, Royal Road Test, Nine Swimming Pools and Broken Glass, Crackers, Babycakes with Weights, Real Estate Opportunities, A Few Palm Trees, Dutch Details, Records, Colored People, and Hard Light

Various publishers, 1963–1978

A rare and highly sought-after set of sixteen artists books by Ed Ruscha. All of the books are first editions and many are either signed (seven) or inscribed (four) by Ruscha.

Each book in this set is complete with original glassine when issued and housed in a recently fabricated archival cloth clamshell box with title and date printed on the spine.

Ruscha’s books mark a significant change in bookmaking by artists as the premise is not to enhance or respond to a text. They are antithetical to the history of livre d’artistes—the books do not contain fine prints (etchings, lithographs, etc.) but are simply printed by the more common offset process. Ruscha’s use of banal subject matter further accentuates his departure from the realm of historical book-making processes.

Made mostly in small editions, these captivating books have received a great deal of critical acclaim, especially in recent years as his prominence as a major contemporary artist has increased.